October 1912
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
« Aug   Nov »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Month October 1912

Atlanta’s Produce Row

THE CONSTITUTION, ATLANTA, GA.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1912.

photo of South Broad street

Sometimes a man is heard lamenting that the days of romance are over. He will wish that he had lived in the days of chivalry. That man is blind. He has only to look around and he will see more romance today than was ever seen at one time in the history of the world before.

As an example, let him take a walk down South Broad street, Atlanta’s Produce Row. He will see barrels of apples from all parts of the Union. They are redolent of the sweet-smelling orchards. As the passerby catches the sweet aroma his mind drifts back to the days when he played around the orchard at home and eat apples to his heart’s content with no fear of indigestion.

Starting at the north end of Produce Row, one of the first things noticed this week was the magnificent display of celery at the Williams-Thompson company’s warehouse. There were crates upon crates of the vegetables, and Mr. M. D. Thompson, of the firm, stated that they had only just received a carload from Buffalo, N. Y., which was almost perfect in quality and which they had been anxiously awaiting for some days, as their customers were now calling for celery. A little further down the street the J. L. Barnes-Fain company was found with a splendid supply of apples. They stated that they had handled four carloads this week and that they had never seen better fruit in quality. This concern also handles large quantities of celery, and, in fact, most every produce found in Atlanta.

A little further down the street again is the Sewell Commission company. This house handles produce direct from producer to consumer. They specialize in poultry and the crates of plump fowl call attention by the cackles.

Another house which handles produce in large quantities is Fain & Stamps. This week they have specialties in apples, oranges and grapefruit.

All in all, Produce Row is among the most romantic spots in Atlanta. In one week produce may be seen there from every state in the Union, as well as from Europe, Central America, South America and Cuba. To the thoughtful passerby the different fruits and vegetables and the cackle of the fowl reminds him of the links which bind Atlanta to the rest of the world, and also of the fact that much of the produce sold here which is brought from great distances might just as well be grown in Georgia and thus keep at home much of the money we are now sending away.